Category Archives: Recognition

Digital Transformation A New Era

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- Mansi Priya, Marketing, Trivone Digital

In the race of technology worldwide, economies are growing at a fast rate. To stay in the competition, one important thing to keep in mind is Digital Transformation. The world is getting increasingly digital everyday in all the aspects of society. It affects both individual businesses and segments of society such as government, medicine, communication etc. But do we know exactly what is this transformation all about? 

According to a market research report by MarketsandMarkets, the global digital transformation market is expected to grow from $150.7 billion to $369.2 billion, at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 19.6%. Big giants such as Microsoft, Google, IBM, Apple, Oracle etc. have become the major vendors for the Digital Transformation market. It has become the primary objective of every organisation to know that how is the digital transformation happening in their industry and its effects on their business. 

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Companies vary in their digital maturity, and the ones who are more mature outperform the ones who are not. The leading digital changes require the leadership teams to have a vision of transforming their company to the digital world.

"What we find with digital transformation work is that it’s not really a technology problem, it’s a leadership problem" – George Westerman, Research Scientist, MIT’s initiative on Digital Economy

The initial step for any organisation is to evaluate key characteristics of their business that should go digital instead of manual. An example of such a scenario could be outdated technology. Revamp it, make your current workforce undergo innovation workshops to enable them brainstorm and collaborate with leaders to identify opportunities for digital transformation.

Redesigning a website every few years will not help to compete in digital economy. Organisations need to make more fundamental changes. Digital has raised customer expectations, the speeds of work has increased, patience levels of people have dropped and the list is endless. So it has become essential for organisations to incorporate the necessary changes. 

Tomorrow’s people will have immediate access to much more information as compared with today. Digital enterprises should be able to deliver their services to customers, using their preferred mode of access. The organisations should leverage social, mobile, analytics and cloud as their enabling technologies. Making use of these upcoming new tools to enhance the business process, organisations transform their business models. 

By transforming the business practises to digital organisations can work and perform better. They save alot of cost, time and gain customer satisfaction more than before. Digital transformation has validated to impact the bottom line and stimulates productivity. Businesses that incorporate digital transformation, according to Gartner, will be able to find opportunities and work in seconds. Some of great successes in digital transformation are Nespresso, Marriott, T-Mobile USA. Organisations who invest in new technologies, people and processes, gain great outcomes which include greater profits and market share as well as talent and better brand loyalty by their customers. 

A recently conducted survey by Altimeter group, a specialist research company based in California, stated increased customer engagement, improved customer satisfaction, higher digital traffic, increased lead generation and greater conversion as the top benefits of digital transformation of a business.

So if you are still thinking about whether to make your business process digital, gear up and embrace yourself, because the world is at a very fast pace. Increase your pace to stay in the competition.

The Case Against Net Neutrality

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- L Subramanyan, CEO Trivone

"The markets, and not the government‎, should decide broadband speeds and quality"

At the beginning, let me make one point clear; I am against throttling of speeds by broadband operators. Agreed..Ok, so lets move on.
The recent rhetoric on Net Neutrality bothers me in one aspect. We have lived without the government’s intervention on the Internet for the last 20 years, so what is the issue all about? Why should the government worry about who gets to see what and consume what content on the Internet? Isn’t it enough that by these very interventionist measures, the government has already hurt (if not mortally) the entire telecom business? Do we need to kill the broadband access also?

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I am not getting into the debate on Net Neutrality here. Supporters of Net Neutrality, which include the ‘creators’ of the commercial Internet Vinton Cerf and Tim Berners Lee, have argued, very successfully, for an open Internet. So has President Obama, and I hear so has, our own minister Ravi Shankar Prasad. Many of the pro-net neutrality arguments are actually anti-content throttling arguments. And I agree with those arguments.

However, what I do find difficult to agree with is the supposition that ‘someone’ ought to regulate what a broadband company ought to charge? I also find it difficult, consequently, to accept Sachin Bansal’s (and other such e commerce players) withdrawal from Airtel’s Zero rating. Let us look at a scenario. I, as a broadband network, have invested in significant sums to build the network. You, as an ecom player, want to leverage the same by providing free access to people who you want as eventual consumers. So you divert a part (a significant part, possibly) of your marketing spend and pay me, the network and pick up the tab for data charges, of the consumers who come to my portal and I, because you are my customer, provide you a faster access speed.

So what is the fuss?

It would be a crime if I throttled the speed for other consumers who may want to go to some other ecom portal. It would also be a crime if I stopped serving other ecom portals. It would further be a crime if I make you go away from my network if you didn’t go to my ecom portal. I am doing none of these. I am providing a preferential access to my customers. By no stretch of imagination is it curbing anybody’s ‘freedom of speech’. On no account are we throttling innovation (I still don’t understand where this argument even came in).
The pro guys argue that the big guys will muscle out the small guys. But, hey, aren’t they already doing it? That the smaller ecom companies will find it difficult to compete. However, the small ecom companies will become big ecom companies by investments and innovating a smarter way to do things. Broadband access is not the reason why ecom companies succeed or fail. It is execution of business models.

As an entrepreneur, it is my job to reach out to the largest number of customers and prospects in the most profitable way. If a network and an entrepreneur have a business agreement that does not violate the law, then why did flipkart do a volte-face and withdraw from Airtel Zero.

The truth is in perception. It is my educated guess that Flipkart did not want to be ‘seen’ as a company that ‘goes against the fundamental freedom of speech and choice’ and ditto for Amazon, Cleartrip and a host of other companies which wanted to battle perception rather than reality.

The other problem with the Net Neutrality principle is that if everybody has equal access and common speeds, then someone is going to have to pay for it. Which essentially means that either the government will stipulate the prices (which will be a Least Common Denominator) with little or no relevance to the investments made or everybody will suffer, like we are in the Mobile telephony business, where you have bits of hurried conversation between call drops!

On the other hand, if TRAI or somebody with some legal backing could simply stipulate the basic minimum standards for broadband speeds, below which the operator could be penalized, then faster speeds could attract premium pricing, which could then actually subsidize ‘free internet for all’.

My biggest fear is that thanks to the politicization of this Net Neutrality debate, there is going to be a significant drop in the creation of the broadband infrastructure, which is abysmal as it is. This will lead to a greater inequality and deepen the digital divide.
The Indian situation calls for some very drastic solutions. We have to significantly increase the broadband footprint across the country. This will call for massive investments by the existing (as well as new players). Sitting on a pedestal and asking for ‘free internet for all’ is not going to happen till then.

Currently, India has amongst the lowest median download speeds in the world, according to the Global Internet Report 2014 at less than 5MBPS, as compared to a median speed of over 20MBPS in Americas, Europe, China and Australia and over 30 MBPS in parts of Europe and Korea. That should be our biggest worry. If there is anything that can throttle content consumption, it is the lack of infrastructure and not zero ratings. An increased and faster access can empower those on the wrong side of digital divide much more dramatically. So comparing our ‘freedom to choose’ to that of the US or Europe has no meaning, at all. In reality, the Indian consumer even today has little freedom to choose, no recourse to lower-than-promised bandwidth, no recourse to deficient or non-existent service and so on and so forth.

Finally, in India, seldom have we had a reasonable debate on critical issues. Matters are normally settled by burning books (or buses), shrill rhetoric (mostly in the English TV press) which is generally a slanging match with a dangerous ‘nation wants to know’ kind of a question or hysterical sound bytes from a less-than-knowledgeable politician. While the Net Neutrality debate showed all signs of degenerating into one (or all) of the above, one hopes that a larger picture is seen by the powers-that-be. This debate is not, simply not, about freedom. In the larger, and Indian scheme of things, it has to be about access to the net.

Trivone Wins Its First Public Award

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Patting oneself on one's own back is a heavenly feeling, second only to scratching one's own back. Bad jokes apart, it feels great to announce on this blog that Trivone Digital Services has been awarded a silver under the category Effectiveness-Publishing-Entertainment at the prestigious DMAi Echo Awards 2014. Trivone's relentless success with Star India and its social media endeavors for its show Koffee With Karan has come to fruition. Our pursuit of excellence for our clients has brought something we will cherish for long. 

We would like to thank the Star team in Mumbai for their tireless efforts and their ingenuity which made it possible. As a young company, we are happy with the recognition for our diligence but are far from satisfied. Ironically, our hunger for more recognition has been stoked by this feather in our cap. This award surely is the first of many that will come our way. We remain steadfast in our commitment to our clients and we are very proud of what we have achievd till date.

Congratulations to everyone at Trivone. Check the list of winners here. Some elite company we are in!

 

Category: Recognition, Success